Samsung files trade mark for ‘Gear Blink’ in Australia

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Samsung has lodged a trade mark in Australia for the term ‘Samsung Gear Blink’, hinting at an as-yet-unannounced new Google Glass rival.

The trade mark was filed yesterday, 20 May, by Samsung and an Australian legal representative, Callinans.

The application follows a similar application by the company filed this week in Korea. Samsung also published patents for glasses-based electronic devices earlier this year.

The Australian trade mark covers a variety of tech devices under classes 9 and 14, including ‘wearable smart phones’ and ‘3D eye glasses’.

Specifically, those devices are:

Class 9: Mobile phones; digital cameras; portable media players; mp3 players; mp4 players; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; television receivers; audio electronic components, namely surround sound systems; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; Light Emitting Diode (LED) displays; monitors; 3D eye glasses; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors; wearable computer peripherals; wearable peripherals for mobile devices; wearable computers; wearable mobile phones and smart phones; mobile phones and smart phones in the shape of a watch; mobile devices in the shape of a watchband

Class 14: Clocks; parts and fittings for watches; wristwatches; electronic clocks and watches; bracelets (jewellery); watchbands; control clocks (master clocks); watches that communicate data to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers and personal computers through Internet websites and other computer and electronic communications networks; watchbands that communicate data to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers and personal computers through Internet websites and other computer and electronic communications networks; bracelets that communicate data to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers and personal computers through Internet websites and other computer and electronic communications networks 

The trade mark is currently at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s ‘Gear Blink’ trade mark.

Bauer Media wants to trade mark the word ‘Glossy’

Bauer MediaPublishing giant Bauer Media Group has registered a new trade mark in Australia for the word ‘Glossy’.

The term ‘glossy magazine’ is a regularly used expression in the media industry, and is even listed in the Macmillan Dictionary, defined as:

A magazine printed on shiny paper, containing a lot of bright fashionable pictures but not much serious information

Bauer Media Group publishes glossy magazines such as ELLE and Cosmopolitan, and has filed trade marks for ‘Glossy’ a number of times over the years.

The original trade mark appears to have been lodged in 2007 by ACP Mastheads (screenshot), the publishing company that Bauer acquired in 2012. This trade mark was registered under Class 41, covering ‘Judging of cars’, and was never added to the trade mark register and has since lapsed.

A second trade mark by ACP Mastheads was registered in 2009 (screenshot) under Class 16, covering printing, and Class 41, covering publishing. This trade mark was also never added to the trade mark register and has lapsed.

The third trade mark was lodged by ACP Mastheads in 2010 (screenshot) under Class 16, covering ‘Staplers’. This application was withdrawn in 2012, shortly after the Bauer acquisition.

A fourth trade mark was filed by Bauer Media in July 2012 (screenshot), and registered under Class 16, covering ‘Staple Removers’. This trade mark is currently ‘Under Examination’, with a decision due soon.

The newest trade mark was filed last week, on May 1, by Bauer Media (screenshot) and is registered under Class 16, covering magazines and printing, and Class 41, covering publishing, competitions and online information.

Specifically, the new trade mark for the term ‘Glossy’ covers:

Class 16: Printed matter; printed awards; stationery; printed publications including magazines, journals, periodicals, newspapers and books; posters; calendars; photographs; instructional and teaching material (except apparatus); cards; paper, cardboard and goods made from these materials in this class

Class 41: Publishing; arranging, organising, hosting, presenting and conducting competitions; entertainment services; cultural services; production of television and radio shows; interactive games services; publication of information on global computer networks including the Internet

The trade mark is currently at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’.

This article will be updated with any more information about the ‘Glossy’ trade mark as it arises.

Samsung wants to trade mark the word ‘Plot’

SamsungLogo

Korean technology giant Samsung has filed for a number of new Australian trade marks in the last week, including one for the word “Plot”.

The six new trade mark applications were lodged on April 16, and are for the terms “Plot”, “App Connect”, “DTOC”, “Citron”, “Diffuser” and the logo of Samsung’s new UHD curved TV (picture).

All the trade mark applications cover Class 9, broadly covering technology of various kinds.

The “Plot” trade mark covers computers, mobile phones, media players, software and electronic books. In summary, they are:

Class 9: Computer application software for mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers, portable media players and handheld computers; computer software for managing and organising various digital reading contents, namely, digital electronic-books, digital electronic-newspapers, thesis and digital electronic-magazines; mobile phones; smart phones; digital cameras; portable media players; mp3 players; mp4 players; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; 3D eye glasses; computers; downloadable electronic publications; downloadable electronic books

If accepted, Samsung could potentially challenge any person or company that has a commercial product listed above that uses the word “Plot” in a prominent way.

A Google search does not appear to bring up any relevant results for Samsung Plot or any of the other trade marks apart from “App Connect”, which is the name of an app on the Samsung Gear device.

Each of the new Samsung trade marks are currently at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning they have not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s trade mark applications for “Plot“, “App Connect“, “DTOC“, “Citron“, “Diffuser” and the logo for the new curved UHD TV.

Samsung files many early 2014, pre-CES trade marks

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Electronics giant Samsung has registered eight trade mark applications in the first three days of 2014, offering potential clues to the company’s plans for the CES consumer electronics event next week.

This comes just a few weeks after Samsung registered trade marks in Australia for ‘SeePlay’ and ‘SightPlay’.

These new 2014 trade marks are for terms including ‘Samsung Panoptic’, ‘Samsung Panagon’ and ‘Samsung NX Mini’.

Others are for ‘Samsung Super-Speed Drive’ and ‘Samsung Fully Detachable Handheld’. Three of the trade marks are not yet listed, and this post will be updated when they are added.

An Australian trade mark for ‘Samsung NX Mini’ adds evidence to today’s report that Samsung may announce a smaller version of its Galaxy NX camera after a US trade mark was filed.

‘Samsung Panagon’ has also been registered in the US, but this appears to be the first time the company has filed a trade mark for ‘Samsung Panoptic’.

The word ‘Panoptic’ is defined as “taking in all parts/aspects in a single view”, suggesting this could be linked to Samsung’s camera division.

The ‘Panagon’, ‘Panoptic’ and ‘NX Mini’ trade marks are registered under the same classes, covering various devices. Specifically:

Class 9: Large size display apparatus, namely, LCD large-screen displays; large size electric bulletin boards; mobile telephones; digital cameras; portable media player; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phone and tablet computers; television receivers; audio component system; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; Light emitting diode displays; Monitors; 3D eye glasses; computer software; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors 

The ‘Super-Speed Drive’ is registered under the above classes and one additional electronic device; ‘solid state drives’.

The ‘Fully Detachable Handheld’ is lodged under classes covering vacuum cleaners, washing machines and dishwashers.

All of Samsung’s new trade marks are at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning they have not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s trade mark applications for ‘Panagon‘, ‘Panoptic‘, ‘NX Mini‘, ‘Super-Speed Drive‘ and ‘Fully Detachable Handheld‘.

Harvey Norman lodges Rick Hart trade mark

photo-2Three months after admitting it had lost money on the “damaged” Rick Hart retail brand, Harvey Norman has filed a trade mark suggesting it is planning to use ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’ branding.

The trade mark, registered on November 20 by Harvey Norman Retailing, is for the term and image (below) of ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’.

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Harvey Norman acquired the Rick Hart chain of appliance stores in 2010, which founder Gerry Harvey has since called a “mistake” and a company spokesperson has said is a “damaged brand”. Most Rick Hart stores have closed or been rebranded to Harvey Norman.

Businessman Rick Hart, who founded the Rick Hart retail chain in 1975, is now a partner in a new Western Australian appliance business, Kitchen HQ.

The ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’ trade mark covers over 100 different appliances, household products and gadgets under Class 35. In summary:

Class 35: Retailing, wholesaling, distribution and other services in this class (including online) furniture, electrical appliances, plumbing goods, building goods, hardware, homewares, home improvement goods, computers, gaming consoles, cooking, refrigerating and ventilating, telecommunications and communications goods, home theatre goods, audio goods, video goods, kitchen, bathroom and laundry equipment, ovens, dishwashers, microwaves, showers, baths, garden appliances, electronic all-in- one home control systems, netbooks.

It remains at the status of ‘Indexing Approving’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Harvey Norman’s ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’ trade mark application.

Southern Cross Austereo files for ‘Breakfast With The Stars’ and ‘Pop Quiz’

about-usSouthern Cross Austereo has lodged a trade mark application for the term ‘Breakfast With The Stars’.

The term is the name of the radio network’s 2Day FM breakfast show hosted by Kyle Sandilands and Jackie O, which is to finish at the end of this week.

There’s already been some tension with trade mark rights between Southern Cross Austereo and the controversial radio pair. According to the Daily Telegraph, SCA is preparing to hand over the trade mark rights to the ‘Kyle and Jackie O’ moniker to the DJs, but last week’s new trade mark suggests the radio network wants to keep the rights to the ‘Breakfast With The Stars’ name.

The new trade mark was lodged on November 20, and covers advertising, broadcast, entertainment and online classes. In summary:

Class 35: Advertising and promotional services; promotions for radio and television stations; organisation of trade competitions

Class 38: Broadcasting services including radio, television and online broadcasting services

Class 41: Entertainment services; live entertainment; organisation of entertainment events; radio entertainment; television entertainment; syndication of radio programmes; conducting phone-in competitions; publication of multimedia material online

Class 45: Online social networking services

The application remains at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning it has yet to be seen by an IP examiner.

This is the first time the radio network has filed a trade mark for ‘Breakfast With The Stars’.

Meanwhile, Southern Cross Austereo lodged a second trade mark application on November 20, for the term ‘Pop Quiz’.

It covers the same trade mark classes as the ‘Breakfast With The Stars’ application, and also remains at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’.

Click to view a screenshot of SCA’s trade mark applications for ‘Breakfast With The Stars‘ and ‘Pop Quiz‘.

Amazon files for .com.au logo

amazonHot on the heels of this week’s newly-launched Australian Kindle eBook store, Amazon has registered a trade mark for the Amazon.com.au logo.

For years the Amazon.com.au domain redirected to the US Amazon website, but this week’s launch of an Australian Kindle and App store finally put a use to the .com.au address.

The trade mark for the logo was registered on November 11, and covers hundreds of goods and services, offering hope that the Australian website will expand beyond eBooks and apps in the future.

In summary, those classes are:

Class 9: Portable and handheld electronic devices for transmitting, storing, manipulating, recording, and reviewing text, images, audio, video and data, including via global computer networks, wireless networks, and electronic communications networks; computers, audio and video players Computer software; computer hardware

Class 35: Advertising; retail online services; retail on-line convenience stores; computerised on-line ordering featuring general merchandise and general consumer goods; retail store services featuring electronic games, computer games, video games, electronic game software, computer game software, and video game software; online retail store services featuring streamed and downloadable pre-recorded electronic games

Class 38: Telecommunications services, including electronic transmission of streamed and downloadable audio and video files via computer and other communications networks

Class 39: Transport, including expedited delivery services; packaging and storage of goods; delivery of goods, in the nature of distribution of general consumer goods, including books, music, video tapes, audio cassettes, compact discs, floppy discs, and CD-ROMS

Class 41: Entertainment; sporting and cultural activities

Class 42: Providing temporary use of on-line non-downloadable cloud computing software for use in electronic storage of data; computer software development in the field of mobile applications

Class 45: Personal and social services rendered by others to meet the needs of individuals

The trade mark was filed by the Las Vegas office of Amazon Technologies Inc. and an Australian legal representative, Gilbert + Tobin Lawyers.

It remains at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Amazon currently has online stores in the USA, UK, China, Japan, India, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Canada, Mexico and Brazil.

Click to view a screenshot of Amazon’s .com.au trade mark application.

Instagram seeks trade mark for ‘INSTA’

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A fortnight after reports surfaced that photography platform Instagram had updated its guidelines to ban apps that feature the words ‘INSTA’ or ‘GRAM’, the Facebook-owned company has lodged an Australian trade mark application for the term ‘INSTA’.

TechCrunch reported two weeks ago that, although it doesn’t currently hold the trade mark for either specific term, Instagram had sent an email to app developers telling them that connected apps that use the words ‘INSTA’ or ‘GRAM’ (such as the popular Luxogram app) will be banned from accessing Instagram unless modified “within a reasonable period”.

Instagram said in the email to developers:

As we hope you can appreciate, protection of its well-known trademarks is very important to Instagram. For example, it has always been against our guidelines to use a name that sounds or looks like “Instagram” or copies the look and feel of our application.

It was assumed this meant the protection of its ‘INSTAGRAM’ trade mark, which it holds in the US, Australia and around the world.

It now seems that Instagram wants the trade mark for at least one of those specific terms.

The company lodged an Australian trade mark on Monday, September 2, for the word ‘INSTA’, alongside the lnstagram logo (pictured).

The trade mark covers five classes across different technology and photographic goods and services. In summary, they include:

Class 9: Downloadable computer software for modifying the appearance and enabling transmission of photographs

Class 38: Telecommunications services, namely electronic transmission of data, messages, graphics, images and information; broadcasting services over computer or other communication networks namely, uploading, posting, displaying, tagging, and electronically transmitting data, information, messages, graphics, and images

Class 41: Photosharing and data sharing services; electronic journals and web logs featuring user generated or specified content

Class 42: Providing a web site that gives users the ability to upload photographs; file sharing services, namely, providing a website featuring technology enabling users to upload and download electronic files; providing temporary use of non-downloadable software applications for social networking, creating a virtual community, and transmission of audio, video, photographic images, text, graphics and data; computer services in the nature of customized web pages featuring user-defined or specified information, personal profiles, audio, video, photographic images, text, graphics and data

Class 45: Social introduction, networking and dating services; providing access to computer databases in the fields of social networking, social introduction and dating

The trade mark application was lodged by the Californian office of ‘Instagram LLC’ and an Australian legal representative, Spruson & Ferguson.

It remains at the early status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner.

A further search reveals that the company also lodged a similar US trade mark for the term ‘INSTA’ in March. A decision is not due on that application until December.

Instagram was purchased by social media giant Facebook last year for approximately USD$1 billion. Facebook is known for its strict brand protection, including a very similar move last year – trade marking the words ‘FACE’, ‘BOOK’, the letter ‘F’ and 70 other Facebook associated terms.

Click to view a screenshot of Instagram’s ‘INSTA’ trade mark application.

Apple hoping to trade mark the term ‘STARTUP’

applegApple has lodged an audacious Australian trade mark application for the term ‘STARTUP’, covering a whole host of products and services.

As with most companies in the field of innovation, Apple is well-known for buying fledgling startups, and only recently acquired mapping platform Embark and video discovery tool Matcha.tv.

The ‘STARTUP’ application was lodged yesterday, August 27, by the Californian headquarters of Apple and a Sydney-based legal representative, Baker & McKenzie.

If accepted, Apple would hold the trade mark of the word ‘STARTUP’ under various retail, computing, mobile and educational classes. Specifically:

Class 35: Retail store services, including retail store services featuring computers, computer software, computer peripherals, mobile phones, and consumer electronic devices, and demonstration of products relating thereto

Class 37: Maintenance, installation and repair of computer hardware, computer peripherals and consumer electronic devices; consulting services in the field of maintenance of computer hardware, computer peripherals, and consumer electronic devices

Class 41: Educational services, including conducting classes, workshops, conferences and seminars in the field of computers, computer software, computer peripherals, mobile phones, and consumer electronic devices and computer-related services; providing information in the field of education

Class 42: Design and development of computer hardware and software; technical support services, namely, troubleshooting of computer hardware and software problems; installation, maintenance and updating of computer software; technological consultancy services in the field of computers, computer software and consumer electronics; computer diagnostic services; computer data recovery

A Google search doesn’t reveal any directly relevant results that could hint at Apple’s intentions, although it has lodged a similar trade mark in the past, both in Australia and the US – the Australian one, from 2011, has never been accepted.

Also, the official Apple website references its operating system booting-up as ‘Startup’ (with a capital letter). In December last year, Apple was awarded the US trade mark for its startup ‘chime’ (the sound a Mac computer makes when switched on).

The trade mark application is at the very early status of ‘Filing – Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner.

Click to view a screenshot of Apple’s ‘STARTUP’ trade mark application.

This is one of a slew of recent trade marks by Apple in Australia. A fortnight ago it lodged for ‘multi-touch’, and in April it successfully trade marked the leaf in its logo.

Read about other recent Apple trade mark filings in Australia here.

Apple isn’t the only major tech company lodging trade marks in Australia this week, with Samsung lodging a trade mark on Wednesday for ‘Samsung Zeq’.

NAB lodges for ‘starXchange’ and ‘Haven’

NAB_LogoNational Australia Bank (NAB) has lodged a slew of local recent trade marks in the last week, and one may be the name of the company’s new digital wallet service.

Last Monday, the bank registered two trade marks for ‘starXchange’, covering financial and communications classes, whilst on Thursday it registered a further two for ‘HAVEN’, covering advertising and retail services.

The classes registered to the ‘starXchange’ trade marks suggest it may be related to June’s news that NAB is on the verge of launching a “digital wallet service”, which has been on trial under the codename of ‘KISS’ but will be renamed “in late July or early August”.

For example, the two trade marks cover classes such as ‘application software used in the provision and transfer of electronic funds’, ‘electronic money transfer services’ and ‘point of sale communication services’ – all of which sound similar to a digital wallet service.

Google searches for ‘starXchange nab‘ and ‘starXchange‘ appear to bring up zero relevant results.

Meanwhile, the ‘HAVEN’ trade mark appears to be a NAB staff service of some kind. One of the two trade marks for the term is ‘HAVEN BY NAB STAFF CLUB’, and a quick Google suggests the ‘Staff Club’ is an employee benefits division within the bank.

The ‘starXchange’ trade marks are at the status of ‘Taken for Examination’, which may mean a decision by an examiner is imminent.

The ‘HAVEN’ trade marks are at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning they have not been seen by an examiner yet.

Click to see a screenshot of NAB’s two ‘starXchange’ trade marks (here and here) and the two ‘HAVEN’ trade marks (here and here).

Sydneysider looks to trade mark Grumpy Cat in Australia

grumpyA Sydney man has lodged two trade marks in the last week for terms linked to the popular internet meme, Grumpy Cat.

The Grumpy Cat image (pictured) originated on Reddit, and has since featured on the front page of the Wall Street Journal and a motion picture based on the feline is in the works.

The first trade mark application, lodged on 6 August, is for the term ‘Grumpy Cat Gear’, covering calendars and printed photographs.

The second, lodged on August 9, is for the term ‘Grumpy Cat Australia’, and covers clothing, footwear and headgear for men, women and children.

Both trade mark applications were lodged by Lewis Thomas Owens, who gives a different address on each application – one in Broadway, Sydney, and another in nearby suburb Leichhardt.

Owens appears to have lodged one other trade mark in the past. In June 2000, he lodged an Australian trade mark for the term ‘TOMCOM’, was was approved but never finalised and lapsed two years later.

A Google search for Owens’ name appears to bring up zero relevant results.

No other trade mark has been lodged for ‘Grumpy Cat’ in Australia, but a trade mark in the US for Grumpy Cat’s image was filed in January by ‘Grumpy Cat Inc. Corp. Ohio’.

Both new trade marks are at an early status, and have yet to be seen by an examiner.

Click to see a screenshot of Owens’ trade marks for ‘Grumpy Cat Australia‘ and ‘Grumpy Cat Gear‘.

Yahoo! may be heading ‘On The Road’ Down Under

yahooroad_0Digital giant Yahoo! has given a strong hint that its popular Yahoo! On The Road music events, which have so far been organised around the US and Europe, may be heading to Australia.

On 26 July, the company lodged an Australian trade mark for the term ‘Yahoo! On The Road’, covering various live music event classes.

The events have flirted with Australian music in the past, with a recent May event in Dallas, Texas, featuring prominent Aussie music acts Empire Of The Sun and Gold Fields.

The Yahoo! On The Road events have attracted some notable acts, including fun., Kendrick Lamaar, John Legend and Fallout Boy.

The current schedule includes various US and European cities, but no Australian dates have been announced yet.

The classes covered by Yahoo!’s Australian trade mark reveal no surprises, specifically:

Class 35: Promoting the concerts of others

Class 41: Arranging and conducting of concerts; concert booking; entertainment, namely live music concerts

The trade mark was lodged by Yahoo! Inc and an Australian legal representative, Davies Collison Cave. It is at the status of ‘Taken For Examination’, meaning it is due to be seen by an examiner. 

Click to view a screenshot of Yahoo!’s ‘On The Road’ trade mark application.

Gina Rinehart’s company lodges for National Mining Day

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Australian mining magnate and media mogul Gina Rinehart’s company Hancock Prospecting has lodged two trade marks for the logo of ‘National Mining Day’.

Both trade mark applications were lodged yesterday, August 6, with one for the full logo (pictured) and another with the red and blue Australia symbol but without the text.

The National Mining Day concept was quietly announced two months ago as the invention of government media publisher Peter Charlton. Rinehart was named as patron for the new annual event, planned for every November 22.

“We will go out every November 22nd, to advise and inform, and ask the Prime Minister, State Premiers, Resource departments state and federal, to cooperate with the media to spread the essence of the [mining] industry and correct the ill informed,” Charlton said.

No website appears to exist for the event yet, and the only apparent use for the logo so far is via a one-page PDF file for the event.

The new trade marks cover a number of goods and services under Class 41, specifically:

Class 41: Arranging and conducting of conferences, congresses, lectures, seminars, symposiums, workshops (training), festivals; Education services; Event management services (organisation of educational, entertainment, sporting or cultural events); Publishing by electronic means; Publishing of documents, newsletters, posters, magazines, printed matter, newspapers; Training; Vocational education

Both trade marks were lodged by ‘Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd’ and a legal representative, Jackson McDonald. These appear to be the only trade marks lodged by Hancock Prospecting in 2013 so far.

The logo is described on the application as “MOUNTAIN IN SYMBOL”, “CORRECT IN MAP”, “AUSTRALIA”.

The applications are currently at the early status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning they have not been seen by an examiner yet.

Click to see a screenshot of Hancock Prospecting’s trade mark application for the National Mining Day logo with text and the logo without text.

US video services Hulu and Vdio lodge Australian trade marks

Hulu1The range of streaming video services in Australia may be on the verge of increasing, if two newly-lodged local trade marks are anything to go by.

Massive US streaming service Hulu and Rdio video streaming offshoot Vdio both lodged trade mark applications in Australia on 18 July and 16 July respectively.

TV and movie streaming leader Netflix already holds an Australian trade mark for its logo, entering the register in October last year.

Whilst Vdio is broadly lodging its trade mark under digital and entertainment classes, Hulu is going the whole hog and lodging under various souvenir classes too.

A summary of the classes Hulu is filing for:

Class 9: Recordable and pre-recorded media; digital media, namely, streaming or downloadable audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos; computer software, namely, downloadable players for audio-visual content

Class 16: Address books; appointment books; pens; binders; bookmarks; books; magazines, bumper stickers; calendars; stationery; gift cards; posters

Class 18:  All purpose sport bags; athletic bags; backpacks; umbrellas

Class 28: Action skill games; arcade games; board games; card games; balls; balloons; video games;

Class 35: Business-to-business advertising; online banner advertising and marketing services; online retail services featuring streaming or downloadable audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos

Class 38: Broadcasting and streaming of audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos via a global computer network; transmission of downloadable audio-visual content in the nature of full-length, partial-length, and clips from motion pictures, television programming, videos, music videos, and music; transmission of video and interactive games; podcasting and webcasting services

Class 41: Education and entertainment services, namely online services providing audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos; providing interactive online games

Class 42: Computer services, namely, hosting a website featuring audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos

Whereas Vdio’s classes are much more straightforward. A summary:

Class 9: Computer software for use in downloading and streaming audio and audiovisual materials via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 35: Retail store services in the field of entertainment featuring pre-recorded audiovisual works and related merchandise, provided via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 38: Streaming of audiovisual materials over the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks; subscription television broadcasting via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 41: Providing a subscription based entertainment website featuring television programming and films

Class 42: Providing a website allowing users to download music and audiovisual materials; providing temporary use of online non-downloadable software that enables users to play and program music and entertainment-related materials

Hulu’s trade mark application was lodged by the Santa Monica office of ‘Hulu, LLC’ and a Sydney-based legal representative, Davies Collison Cave. The company holds another local trade mark for its name from 2008.

Vdio’s application was lodged by the San Francisco office of ‘Vdio, Inc’ and a Canberra-based legal representative, AJ Park. 

Both trade mark applications are at the early status of ‘Indexing Approved’.

Click to view a screenshot of the trade applications for Hulu and Vdio.