Samsung files trade mark for ‘Gear Blink’ in Australia

samsung

Samsung has lodged a trade mark in Australia for the term ‘Samsung Gear Blink’, hinting at an as-yet-unannounced new Google Glass rival.

The trade mark was filed yesterday, 20 May, by Samsung and an Australian legal representative, Callinans.

The application follows a similar application by the company filed this week in Korea. Samsung also published patents for glasses-based electronic devices earlier this year.

The Australian trade mark covers a variety of tech devices under classes 9 and 14, including ‘wearable smart phones’ and ‘3D eye glasses’.

Specifically, those devices are:

Class 9: Mobile phones; digital cameras; portable media players; mp3 players; mp4 players; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; television receivers; audio electronic components, namely surround sound systems; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; Light Emitting Diode (LED) displays; monitors; 3D eye glasses; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors; wearable computer peripherals; wearable peripherals for mobile devices; wearable computers; wearable mobile phones and smart phones; mobile phones and smart phones in the shape of a watch; mobile devices in the shape of a watchband

Class 14: Clocks; parts and fittings for watches; wristwatches; electronic clocks and watches; bracelets (jewellery); watchbands; control clocks (master clocks); watches that communicate data to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers and personal computers through Internet websites and other computer and electronic communications networks; watchbands that communicate data to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers and personal computers through Internet websites and other computer and electronic communications networks; bracelets that communicate data to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers and personal computers through Internet websites and other computer and electronic communications networks 

The trade mark is currently at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s ‘Gear Blink’ trade mark.

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Bauer Media wants to trade mark the word ‘Glossy’

Bauer MediaPublishing giant Bauer Media Group has registered a new trade mark in Australia for the word ‘Glossy’.

The term ‘glossy magazine’ is a regularly used expression in the media industry, and is even listed in the Macmillan Dictionary, defined as:

A magazine printed on shiny paper, containing a lot of bright fashionable pictures but not much serious information

Bauer Media Group publishes glossy magazines such as ELLE and Cosmopolitan, and has filed trade marks for ‘Glossy’ a number of times over the years.

The original trade mark appears to have been lodged in 2007 by ACP Mastheads (screenshot), the publishing company that Bauer acquired in 2012. This trade mark was registered under Class 41, covering ‘Judging of cars’, and was never added to the trade mark register and has since lapsed.

A second trade mark by ACP Mastheads was registered in 2009 (screenshot) under Class 16, covering printing, and Class 41, covering publishing. This trade mark was also never added to the trade mark register and has lapsed.

The third trade mark was lodged by ACP Mastheads in 2010 (screenshot) under Class 16, covering ‘Staplers’. This application was withdrawn in 2012, shortly after the Bauer acquisition.

A fourth trade mark was filed by Bauer Media in July 2012 (screenshot), and registered under Class 16, covering ‘Staple Removers’. This trade mark is currently ‘Under Examination’, with a decision due soon.

The newest trade mark was filed last week, on May 1, by Bauer Media (screenshot) and is registered under Class 16, covering magazines and printing, and Class 41, covering publishing, competitions and online information.

Specifically, the new trade mark for the term ‘Glossy’ covers:

Class 16: Printed matter; printed awards; stationery; printed publications including magazines, journals, periodicals, newspapers and books; posters; calendars; photographs; instructional and teaching material (except apparatus); cards; paper, cardboard and goods made from these materials in this class

Class 41: Publishing; arranging, organising, hosting, presenting and conducting competitions; entertainment services; cultural services; production of television and radio shows; interactive games services; publication of information on global computer networks including the Internet

The trade mark is currently at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’.

This article will be updated with any more information about the ‘Glossy’ trade mark as it arises.

UPDATED: Woolworths seeks trade marks for tech-related ‘Be’ and ‘Hub’

Woolworths Aus Australia Logo

Australian supermarket Woolworths has lodged a trade mark for the logo of a new product, service or division called ‘Hub’.

The trade mark was registered on April 9 by the Sydney headquarters of Woolworths and a legal representative, Spruson & Ferguson.

It covers a range of technology-related goods and services across Class 9. Specifically:

Class 9: Scientific and photographic apparatus and instruments; apparatus for recording, transmission or reproduction of sound or images; magnetic data carriers, recording discs; calculating machines, data processing equipment and computers; computer peripheral devices, computer accessories and parts therefor including keyboards, port hubs, mouses and mouse pads, cables, headphones, speakers, computer cases; data storage devices including USB flash drives, CDs, DVDs; cameras including webcams; data processing equipment including readers and calculators; mobile phones; mobile phone accessories including holders, cases, covers and straps

Woolworths HubThe trade mark is at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

The logo (pictured right) states that ‘Hub’ is “Exclusively at Woolworths”.

An online search appears to show that the logo has not appeared online before. Furthermore, an online search does not appear to bring up any relevant results for a Woolworths-related ‘Hub’.

Click here to view a screenshot of Woolworths’ ‘Hub’ trade mark.

UPDATE

Be Entertained

28 April 2014: The ‘Hub’ trade mark could be related to another Woolworths trade mark registered recently, for the logo (pictured above) of a new brand called ‘Be’.

The ‘Be’ logo has the tagline “be entertained”, and the application is looking to trade mark three colour-variations of the logo above.

The trade mark was filed on March 18 by Woolworths Limited and a legal representative, King & Wood Mallesons. It is at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’.

It covers similar technology goods and services as the ‘Hub’ trade mark, as well as additional classes covering ‘goods made from paper or cardboard’ and ‘office furniture’.

An online search for the ‘Be’ logo suggests it has not appeared online before. Further searching for the name linked with Woolworths appears to bring up zero relevant results.

Click here to view a screenshot of Woolworths’ trade mark application for ‘Be’.

Samsung wants to trade mark the word ‘Plot’

SamsungLogo

Korean technology giant Samsung has filed for a number of new Australian trade marks in the last week, including one for the word “Plot”.

The six new trade mark applications were lodged on April 16, and are for the terms “Plot”, “App Connect”, “DTOC”, “Citron”, “Diffuser” and the logo of Samsung’s new UHD curved TV (picture).

All the trade mark applications cover Class 9, broadly covering technology of various kinds.

The “Plot” trade mark covers computers, mobile phones, media players, software and electronic books. In summary, they are:

Class 9: Computer application software for mobile phones, smart phones, tablet computers, portable media players and handheld computers; computer software for managing and organising various digital reading contents, namely, digital electronic-books, digital electronic-newspapers, thesis and digital electronic-magazines; mobile phones; smart phones; digital cameras; portable media players; mp3 players; mp4 players; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; 3D eye glasses; computers; downloadable electronic publications; downloadable electronic books

If accepted, Samsung could potentially challenge any person or company that has a commercial product listed above that uses the word “Plot” in a prominent way.

A Google search does not appear to bring up any relevant results for Samsung Plot or any of the other trade marks apart from “App Connect”, which is the name of an app on the Samsung Gear device.

Each of the new Samsung trade marks are currently at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning they have not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s trade mark applications for “Plot“, “App Connect“, “DTOC“, “Citron“, “Diffuser” and the logo for the new curved UHD TV.

UPDATED: Samsung files for ‘Dark Screen’, ‘Finger Scanner’ and a vehicle control app icon

SamsungLogoElectronics giant Samsung has filed new trade marks in Australia for the terms ‘Dark Screen’ and ‘Finger Scanner’.

The company announced earlier today that the new Samsung Galaxy S5 will have a fingerprint scanner, but the company appears to want to trade mark the term as well as implementing it on new devices.

The trade mark for ‘Finger Scanner’ was registered on February 20 and covers exactly one class: mobile phones.

Apple’s similar fingerprint scanner is called ‘Touch ID’, and the company registered a trade mark for that term last month.

The ‘Dark Screen’ trade mark was registered a day later, and covers a broader variety of classes. Specifically:

Class 9: Mobile telephones; digital cameras; portable media player; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; television receivers; audio electronic components, namely surround sound systems; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; light emitting diode displays; monitors; 3D eye glasses; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors; computer software; computer application software for mobile phones 

A Google search does not appear to bring up any relevant results about what the ‘Dark Screen’ trade mark will be used for.

Both trade marks were filed by the Korean headquarters of Samsung and a Sydney-based legal representative, Spruson & Ferguson.

They remain at the early status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning they have yet to been seen by an IP examiner.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s trade mark applications for ‘Dark Screen‘ and ‘Finger Scanner‘.

UPDATE

On February 20, the same day that Samsung registered for the ‘Finger Scanner’ trade mark, the company also filed for a steering wheel image, as seen below:

Samsung steering wheel appA Google search for the image, presumably an app icon, suggests it has not appeared online before.

The trade mark covers classes very similar to the trade marks above, with one notable addition: “computer application software for mobile phones and smart phones for vehicle control”.

The full list is below:

Class 9: Mobile telephones; smart phones; digital cameras; portable media players; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; television receivers; audio electronic components, namely surround sound systems; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; light emitting diode (LED) displays; monitors; 3D eye glasses; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors; computer software for vehicle control; computer application software for mobile phones and smart phones for vehicle control

There have been recent articles about Samsung’s Galaxy Gear device “controlling” a car.

The application remains at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s steering wheel trade mark.

Samsung files many early 2014, pre-CES trade marks

SamsungLogo

Electronics giant Samsung has registered eight trade mark applications in the first three days of 2014, offering potential clues to the company’s plans for the CES consumer electronics event next week.

This comes just a few weeks after Samsung registered trade marks in Australia for ‘SeePlay’ and ‘SightPlay’.

These new 2014 trade marks are for terms including ‘Samsung Panoptic’, ‘Samsung Panagon’ and ‘Samsung NX Mini’.

Others are for ‘Samsung Super-Speed Drive’ and ‘Samsung Fully Detachable Handheld’. Three of the trade marks are not yet listed, and this post will be updated when they are added.

An Australian trade mark for ‘Samsung NX Mini’ adds evidence to today’s report that Samsung may announce a smaller version of its Galaxy NX camera after a US trade mark was filed.

‘Samsung Panagon’ has also been registered in the US, but this appears to be the first time the company has filed a trade mark for ‘Samsung Panoptic’.

The word ‘Panoptic’ is defined as “taking in all parts/aspects in a single view”, suggesting this could be linked to Samsung’s camera division.

The ‘Panagon’, ‘Panoptic’ and ‘NX Mini’ trade marks are registered under the same classes, covering various devices. Specifically:

Class 9: Large size display apparatus, namely, LCD large-screen displays; large size electric bulletin boards; mobile telephones; digital cameras; portable media player; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phone and tablet computers; television receivers; audio component system; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; Light emitting diode displays; Monitors; 3D eye glasses; computer software; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors 

The ‘Super-Speed Drive’ is registered under the above classes and one additional electronic device; ‘solid state drives’.

The ‘Fully Detachable Handheld’ is lodged under classes covering vacuum cleaners, washing machines and dishwashers.

All of Samsung’s new trade marks are at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning they have not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s trade mark applications for ‘Panagon‘, ‘Panoptic‘, ‘NX Mini‘, ‘Super-Speed Drive‘ and ‘Fully Detachable Handheld‘.

Harvey Norman lodges Rick Hart trade mark

photo-2Three months after admitting it had lost money on the “damaged” Rick Hart retail brand, Harvey Norman has filed a trade mark suggesting it is planning to use ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’ branding.

The trade mark, registered on November 20 by Harvey Norman Retailing, is for the term and image (below) of ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’.

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Harvey Norman acquired the Rick Hart chain of appliance stores in 2010, which founder Gerry Harvey has since called a “mistake” and a company spokesperson has said is a “damaged brand”. Most Rick Hart stores have closed or been rebranded to Harvey Norman.

Businessman Rick Hart, who founded the Rick Hart retail chain in 1975, is now a partner in a new Western Australian appliance business, Kitchen HQ.

The ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’ trade mark covers over 100 different appliances, household products and gadgets under Class 35. In summary:

Class 35: Retailing, wholesaling, distribution and other services in this class (including online) furniture, electrical appliances, plumbing goods, building goods, hardware, homewares, home improvement goods, computers, gaming consoles, cooking, refrigerating and ventilating, telecommunications and communications goods, home theatre goods, audio goods, video goods, kitchen, bathroom and laundry equipment, ovens, dishwashers, microwaves, showers, baths, garden appliances, electronic all-in- one home control systems, netbooks.

It remains at the status of ‘Indexing Approving’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Harvey Norman’s ‘Rick Hart @ Harvey Norman’ trade mark application.