Samsung files trade marks for ‘SeePlay’ and ‘SightPlay’

samsungKorean electronics giant Samsung has lodged two Australian trade marks this week for the terms ‘SeePlay’ and ‘SightPlay’.

The trade marks, filed on December 5, cover devices including smartphones, tablets, digital cameras and computers. They were lodged by the Korean headquarters of Samsung and an Australian legal representative, Callinans.

The exact classes covered by the trade marks are:

Class 9: Mobile telephones; digital cameras; portable media players; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; television receivers; mobile phones; smart phones; tablet computers; audio component systems; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; light emitting diode displays; monitors; 3D eye glasses; computer software; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors; data processing apparatus for large format displays; large format display monitors; large format display panels; large format displays; computer software for large format displays  

A Google search for both ‘Samsung SeePlay‘ and ‘Samsung SightPlay‘ appears to bring up zero relevant results.

However, SeePlay.com (which is offline) was registered by a fellow Korean company, domain registrar Netpia, earlier this year. SightPlay.com is registered to a US company and is also not currently in use.

The terms could be related to a Google Glass-like device, which has been rumoured since the company was awarded a patent at the end of October.

Both trade marks remain at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning they have not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s trade mark applications for ‘SeePlay‘ and ‘SightPlay‘.

 

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Apple lodges for ‘multi-touch’… again

18-16_multitouchIn the midst of global courtroom battles with Samsung and Google, Apple is hoping to add extra protection to its multi-touch capabilities by lodging a trade mark for the term.

The tech giant lodged an Australian trade mark last Friday, 9 August, for ‘MULTI-TOUCH’, covering various electronic devices.

Apple originally lodged a trade mark for the term covering similar classes in 2007 but, after being accepted by an examiner, was never registered the company and the application eventually lapsed unprotected in 2009. It registered for a similar trade mark again in 2009, but the process repeated – it was accepted but the application was never finalised by Apple and the application was withdrawn in 2011.

This new application covers more devices than the previous two now-lapsed applications.

The lodgement comes in the wake of the International Trade Commission stating last week that some of Apple’s patents for multi-touch technology should be heard by courts, with one judge saying “its multi-touch work was worthy of strong protection”.

If accepted, Apple will hold the trade mark in Australia for the term ‘multi-touch’ on computer hardware, mobile phones, televisions, cameras, video game consoles and various other devices, specifically:

Class 9: Computer hardware and software but excluding computer software for managing the clinical performance of health workers and computer software for the analysis of defects and computer software designed to estimate costs; handheld and mobile digital electronic devices for the sending and receiving of telephone calls, faxes, electronic mail, and other digital data; MP3 and other digital format audio players; handheld computers, personal digital assistants, electronic organizers, electronic notepads; magnetic data carriers; telephones, mobile phones, cell phones; computer gaming machines, videophones, cameras; computer and consumer electronic input devices; computer and consumer electronic monitors and screens; televisions

The new trade mark application is at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an examiner yet. It was lodged by the Californian office of Apple Inc and an Australian legal representative, Baker & McKenzie.

Click to view a screenshot of Apple’s new MULTI-TOUCH trade mark application. Also click to see the MULTI-TOUCH trade mark applications from 2007 and 2009.

US video services Hulu and Vdio lodge Australian trade marks

Hulu1The range of streaming video services in Australia may be on the verge of increasing, if two newly-lodged local trade marks are anything to go by.

Massive US streaming service Hulu and Rdio video streaming offshoot Vdio both lodged trade mark applications in Australia on 18 July and 16 July respectively.

TV and movie streaming leader Netflix already holds an Australian trade mark for its logo, entering the register in October last year.

Whilst Vdio is broadly lodging its trade mark under digital and entertainment classes, Hulu is going the whole hog and lodging under various souvenir classes too.

A summary of the classes Hulu is filing for:

Class 9: Recordable and pre-recorded media; digital media, namely, streaming or downloadable audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos; computer software, namely, downloadable players for audio-visual content

Class 16: Address books; appointment books; pens; binders; bookmarks; books; magazines, bumper stickers; calendars; stationery; gift cards; posters

Class 18:  All purpose sport bags; athletic bags; backpacks; umbrellas

Class 28: Action skill games; arcade games; board games; card games; balls; balloons; video games;

Class 35: Business-to-business advertising; online banner advertising and marketing services; online retail services featuring streaming or downloadable audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos

Class 38: Broadcasting and streaming of audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos via a global computer network; transmission of downloadable audio-visual content in the nature of full-length, partial-length, and clips from motion pictures, television programming, videos, music videos, and music; transmission of video and interactive games; podcasting and webcasting services

Class 41: Education and entertainment services, namely online services providing audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos; providing interactive online games

Class 42: Computer services, namely, hosting a website featuring audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos

Whereas Vdio’s classes are much more straightforward. A summary:

Class 9: Computer software for use in downloading and streaming audio and audiovisual materials via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 35: Retail store services in the field of entertainment featuring pre-recorded audiovisual works and related merchandise, provided via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 38: Streaming of audiovisual materials over the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks; subscription television broadcasting via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 41: Providing a subscription based entertainment website featuring television programming and films

Class 42: Providing a website allowing users to download music and audiovisual materials; providing temporary use of online non-downloadable software that enables users to play and program music and entertainment-related materials

Hulu’s trade mark application was lodged by the Santa Monica office of ‘Hulu, LLC’ and a Sydney-based legal representative, Davies Collison Cave. The company holds another local trade mark for its name from 2008.

Vdio’s application was lodged by the San Francisco office of ‘Vdio, Inc’ and a Canberra-based legal representative, AJ Park. 

Both trade mark applications are at the early status of ‘Indexing Approved’.

Click to view a screenshot of the trade applications for Hulu and Vdio.