UPDATED: Samsung files for ‘Dark Screen’, ‘Finger Scanner’ and a vehicle control app icon

SamsungLogoElectronics giant Samsung has filed new trade marks in Australia for the terms ‘Dark Screen’ and ‘Finger Scanner’.

The company announced earlier today that the new Samsung Galaxy S5 will have a fingerprint scanner, but the company appears to want to trade mark the term as well as implementing it on new devices.

The trade mark for ‘Finger Scanner’ was registered on February 20 and covers exactly one class: mobile phones.

Apple’s similar fingerprint scanner is called ‘Touch ID’, and the company registered a trade mark for that term last month.

The ‘Dark Screen’ trade mark was registered a day later, and covers a broader variety of classes. Specifically:

Class 9: Mobile telephones; digital cameras; portable media player; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; television receivers; audio electronic components, namely surround sound systems; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; light emitting diode displays; monitors; 3D eye glasses; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors; computer software; computer application software for mobile phones 

A Google search does not appear to bring up any relevant results about what the ‘Dark Screen’ trade mark will be used for.

Both trade marks were filed by the Korean headquarters of Samsung and a Sydney-based legal representative, Spruson & Ferguson.

They remain at the early status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning they have yet to been seen by an IP examiner.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s trade mark applications for ‘Dark Screen‘ and ‘Finger Scanner‘.

UPDATE

On February 20, the same day that Samsung registered for the ‘Finger Scanner’ trade mark, the company also filed for a steering wheel image, as seen below:

Samsung steering wheel appA Google search for the image, presumably an app icon, suggests it has not appeared online before.

The trade mark covers classes very similar to the trade marks above, with one notable addition: “computer application software for mobile phones and smart phones for vehicle control”.

The full list is below:

Class 9: Mobile telephones; smart phones; digital cameras; portable media players; portable computers; wireless headsets for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; rechargeable batteries; battery chargers; leather cases for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; flip covers for mobile phones, smart phones and tablet computers; tablet computers; television receivers; audio electronic components, namely surround sound systems; digital set-top boxes; DVD players; light emitting diode (LED) displays; monitors; 3D eye glasses; computers; printers for computers; semiconductors; computer software for vehicle control; computer application software for mobile phones and smart phones for vehicle control

There have been recent articles about Samsung’s Galaxy Gear device “controlling” a car.

The application remains at the status of ‘Indexing Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an IP examiner yet.

Click to view a screenshot of Samsung’s steering wheel trade mark.

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LG hints at Chrome OS devices

lg_logoSouth Korean technology giant LG has lodged a host of Australian trade marks that suggest it is planning to launch a range of Google Chrome OS-based devices.

In the last week, the company has filed trade marks for ‘ChromeOne’, ‘ChromeDesk’ and ‘ChromeStation’, all covering various technology devices.

LG currently partners with Google on the ‘Nexus’ brand of smartphones, including the soon-to-launch Google Nexus 5.

Samsung, HP and Acer all currently have ‘Chromebook’ laptop devices on the market.

All three of the trade marks were lodged on October 16 by the Korean headquarters of LG Electronics and an Australian legal representative, Griffith Hack.

They cover the exact same range of technology classes, including laptops, mobile phones and tablet computers. Specifically those classes are:

Class 9: Projectors; head phones; mobile phones; television receivers; speakers for television; universal serial bus (USB) drives; monitors for computers; laptop computers; computers; digital versatile disc (DVD) players; portable hard disk drives for computer; apparatus for recording, transmission or reproduction of sound or images; computer application software; audio receivers; settop boxes; car speakers; speakers for home theaters; audio-video (AV) receivers for home theaters; convertible computers; tablet computers

Despite being lodged last Wednesday, all three of LG’s trade marks are already at the status of ‘Taken For Examination’. Nearly every other trade mark registered on that day is at the earlier status of ‘Indexing Approved’, suggesting LG is fast-tracking these trade marks — possibly for a Google Play event in New York scheduled for October 24.

A Google search for ‘ChromeOne’ , ‘ChromeStation’ and ‘ChromeDesk’ do not appear to bring up any relevant results.

Click to view a screenshot of LG’s trade marks for ‘ChromeOne’, ‘ChromeDesk’ and ‘ChromeStation’.

Apple lodges for ‘multi-touch’… again

18-16_multitouchIn the midst of global courtroom battles with Samsung and Google, Apple is hoping to add extra protection to its multi-touch capabilities by lodging a trade mark for the term.

The tech giant lodged an Australian trade mark last Friday, 9 August, for ‘MULTI-TOUCH’, covering various electronic devices.

Apple originally lodged a trade mark for the term covering similar classes in 2007 but, after being accepted by an examiner, was never registered the company and the application eventually lapsed unprotected in 2009. It registered for a similar trade mark again in 2009, but the process repeated – it was accepted but the application was never finalised by Apple and the application was withdrawn in 2011.

This new application covers more devices than the previous two now-lapsed applications.

The lodgement comes in the wake of the International Trade Commission stating last week that some of Apple’s patents for multi-touch technology should be heard by courts, with one judge saying “its multi-touch work was worthy of strong protection”.

If accepted, Apple will hold the trade mark in Australia for the term ‘multi-touch’ on computer hardware, mobile phones, televisions, cameras, video game consoles and various other devices, specifically:

Class 9: Computer hardware and software but excluding computer software for managing the clinical performance of health workers and computer software for the analysis of defects and computer software designed to estimate costs; handheld and mobile digital electronic devices for the sending and receiving of telephone calls, faxes, electronic mail, and other digital data; MP3 and other digital format audio players; handheld computers, personal digital assistants, electronic organizers, electronic notepads; magnetic data carriers; telephones, mobile phones, cell phones; computer gaming machines, videophones, cameras; computer and consumer electronic input devices; computer and consumer electronic monitors and screens; televisions

The new trade mark application is at the status of ‘Filed – Approved’, meaning it has not been seen by an examiner yet. It was lodged by the Californian office of Apple Inc and an Australian legal representative, Baker & McKenzie.

Click to view a screenshot of Apple’s new MULTI-TOUCH trade mark application. Also click to see the MULTI-TOUCH trade mark applications from 2007 and 2009.

Google’s ‘LOON’ enters Australian trade mark register

loon googleGoogle has had its Australian trade mark application for the term ‘LOON’ accepted, and it officially entered the register three weeks ago.

The trade mark – TM number 1535528 – was first lodged back in January, and filed under ‘telecommunications services’ in Class 38.

It appears to have been lodged as a priority application, after being accepted only a fortnight after first filing.

Google has a similar US trade mark application in January, along with an additional logo (pictured). The US trade mark is not yet accepted though, with a response due in October.

The logo is similar to one displayed at loon.com.au, which is owned by Aaron Loon, who claims to be a Google employee on his Google+ page.

™Watch has contacted Aaron Loon and is awaiting a response.

Click to view a screenshot of Google’s Australian trade mark application for ‘LOON’.