‘Hulu’ was officially trade marked in Australia this week

Hulu1After initially registering for an Australian trade mark in July last year, Hulu was accepted and officially entered the trade mark register in Australia this week.

The trade mark protection could be a step closer to the leading US video-streaming service making an entry into the Australian market. The company already owns the Hulu.com.au domain, which currently redirects to Hulu.com, and states on its website that it is “committed to making its content available worldwide” but “must work through a number of legal and business issues” first.

The ‘HULU’ trade mark entered the Australian trade mark register on February 20, and covers everything from video-streaming to calendars.

A summary of the classes covered by the trade mark can be found on the original ™Watch article from July last year.

The application was lodged by the Santa Monica office of ‘Hulu, LLC’ and a Sydney-based legal representative, Davies Collison Cave.

Click to view a screenshot of Hulu’s Australian trade mark.

H/T @aafuss
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Sydneysider looks to trade mark Grumpy Cat in Australia

grumpyA Sydney man has lodged two trade marks in the last week for terms linked to the popular internet meme, Grumpy Cat.

The Grumpy Cat image (pictured) originated on Reddit, and has since featured on the front page of the Wall Street Journal and a motion picture based on the feline is in the works.

The first trade mark application, lodged on 6 August, is for the term ‘Grumpy Cat Gear’, covering calendars and printed photographs.

The second, lodged on August 9, is for the term ‘Grumpy Cat Australia’, and covers clothing, footwear and headgear for men, women and children.

Both trade mark applications were lodged by Lewis Thomas Owens, who gives a different address on each application – one in Broadway, Sydney, and another in nearby suburb Leichhardt.

Owens appears to have lodged one other trade mark in the past. In June 2000, he lodged an Australian trade mark for the term ‘TOMCOM’, was was approved but never finalised and lapsed two years later.

A Google search for Owens’ name appears to bring up zero relevant results.

No other trade mark has been lodged for ‘Grumpy Cat’ in Australia, but a trade mark in the US for Grumpy Cat’s image was filed in January by ‘Grumpy Cat Inc. Corp. Ohio’.

Both new trade marks are at an early status, and have yet to be seen by an examiner.

Click to see a screenshot of Owens’ trade marks for ‘Grumpy Cat Australia‘ and ‘Grumpy Cat Gear‘.

US video services Hulu and Vdio lodge Australian trade marks

Hulu1The range of streaming video services in Australia may be on the verge of increasing, if two newly-lodged local trade marks are anything to go by.

Massive US streaming service Hulu and Rdio video streaming offshoot Vdio both lodged trade mark applications in Australia on 18 July and 16 July respectively.

TV and movie streaming leader Netflix already holds an Australian trade mark for its logo, entering the register in October last year.

Whilst Vdio is broadly lodging its trade mark under digital and entertainment classes, Hulu is going the whole hog and lodging under various souvenir classes too.

A summary of the classes Hulu is filing for:

Class 9: Recordable and pre-recorded media; digital media, namely, streaming or downloadable audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos; computer software, namely, downloadable players for audio-visual content

Class 16: Address books; appointment books; pens; binders; bookmarks; books; magazines, bumper stickers; calendars; stationery; gift cards; posters

Class 18:  All purpose sport bags; athletic bags; backpacks; umbrellas

Class 28: Action skill games; arcade games; board games; card games; balls; balloons; video games;

Class 35: Business-to-business advertising; online banner advertising and marketing services; online retail services featuring streaming or downloadable audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos

Class 38: Broadcasting and streaming of audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos via a global computer network; transmission of downloadable audio-visual content in the nature of full-length, partial-length, and clips from motion pictures, television programming, videos, music videos, and music; transmission of video and interactive games; podcasting and webcasting services

Class 41: Education and entertainment services, namely online services providing audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos; providing interactive online games

Class 42: Computer services, namely, hosting a website featuring audio-visual content in the fields of news, entertainment, sports, comedy, drama, music, and music videos

Whereas Vdio’s classes are much more straightforward. A summary:

Class 9: Computer software for use in downloading and streaming audio and audiovisual materials via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 35: Retail store services in the field of entertainment featuring pre-recorded audiovisual works and related merchandise, provided via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 38: Streaming of audiovisual materials over the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks; subscription television broadcasting via the Internet, mobile devices, wireless internet networks and other computer and electronic communication networks

Class 41: Providing a subscription based entertainment website featuring television programming and films

Class 42: Providing a website allowing users to download music and audiovisual materials; providing temporary use of online non-downloadable software that enables users to play and program music and entertainment-related materials

Hulu’s trade mark application was lodged by the Santa Monica office of ‘Hulu, LLC’ and a Sydney-based legal representative, Davies Collison Cave. The company holds another local trade mark for its name from 2008.

Vdio’s application was lodged by the San Francisco office of ‘Vdio, Inc’ and a Canberra-based legal representative, AJ Park. 

Both trade mark applications are at the early status of ‘Indexing Approved’.

Click to view a screenshot of the trade applications for Hulu and Vdio.

Clive Palmer continues Titanic trade mark haul

Titanic2

Eccentric Australian businessman Clive Palmer, who is funding the construction of a ‘Titanic II’, has recently lodged a trove of Australian trade mark applications for a variety of Titanic-related logos and terms.

His newly set-up cruise company Blue Star Line already lodged a host of trade mark applications back in January, as reported by BrisbaneTimes.com.au, but Clive Palmer himself has recently lodged very similar trade marks in his own name.

The trade mark applications include the logo for ‘Titanic II’ (pictured), three more associated logos and even the term ‘Titanic III’ – suggesting the businessman is confident his Titanic II cruise liner will be a success.

The list of applied-for applications also includes the term ‘Gigantic’. The Brisbane Times article claims that ‘Palmer believed Gigantic was one of the names White Star Line, owners of the original Titanic, considered for its Olympic class of ships, but never got to use’ and added that he was attempting to trademark the term “just in case”.

The recently lodged trade mark applications for the four ‘Titanic II’ logos, the terms ‘Gigantic’ and ‘Titanic III’ and the additional term ‘RMS Titanic’ cover virtually every trade mark Class possible – from Class 1 to Class 45, and every other Class inbetween.

If accepted, it would mean Palmer and his new cruise company could hold the Australian trade mark for virtually every possible ‘Titanic II’, ‘Gigantic’, ‘Titanic III’ and ‘RMS Titanic’ related or named product or service.

This could be a cause of concern for blockbuster movie Titanic’s studio 20th Century Fox, as some of Classes covered for most of Palmer’s trade mark applications include terms that could crossover with the Oscar-winning movie – such as “film production”, “movie theatre presentations”, “cinema presentations”, “entertainment”, “rental of motion pictures” and “DVDs”.

20th Century Fox already holds the Australian trade mark for the Titanic movie logo, under Class 41 of various movie-related services. That trade mark was lodged and accepted in 1998, and expires in 2018.

The film studio has not lodged any oppositions against any of the Blue Star Line or Clive Palmer trade mark applications at the time of publication.

The stated owner of the recently lodged trade marks is “Clive Palmer”, and the current status for all of them is “Indexing Approved”.

The trade marks were lodged between 21 March 2013 and 3 April 2013.

Click to view a screenshot of the Clive Palmer-lodged applications for: ‘Titanic II‘, ‘Gigantic‘, ‘Titanic III‘ and ‘RMS Titanic‘.

Also click to view a screenshot of the very similar Blue Star Line trade mark application from January for ‘Titanic II‘ and the 20th Century Fox registered trademark for the Titanic movie logo from 1998.